Why are Americans so unhappy with their beer?

The United States has been a nation of beer drinkers for years, but Americans’ distaste for their beer is at a record high, according to new research published in the journal Science.

The United Kingdom, the US, Canada and Australia all had higher beer consumption rates than the United States, according the research, which used data from the National Survey of Food and Drug Administration (NSFDA). 

The researchers, led by David Ludwig, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, also found that beer consumption among Americans has grown by roughly 2% per year since 2004.

The study was conducted by researchers at the US National Institute of Health and was published in Science.

Ludwig and his colleagues used data on more than 10,000 adults in the US and in Canada from 2004 to 2010.

Their analysis showed that the US has more than tripled the number of people who have been diagnosed with a foodborne illness in the last five years compared with the previous five.

The researchers found that the increase was even more dramatic for people who drink beer at least a few times a month.

“There are now more people who are diagnosed with foodborne illnesses than in the previous 20 years,” Ludwig told the BBC.

A large number of Americans are drinking more beer, but Ludwig believes that many of them are simply drinking less.

“Beer consumption in the United Kingdom is much higher than in America.

But it’s still lower than in Australia,” Ludwig said.

Despite the fact that Americans consume more beer than anyone else, Ludwig thinks the number will probably fall again as the beer industry continues to grow and as more people begin to understand the health risks of drinking it.

“The more Americans know about the health hazards of drinking beer, the more people will drink less,” Ludwig says.

It is difficult to predict the future, he says.

“It’s too early to say whether beer consumption will continue to increase as a country.

But we do know that people who consume beer have a much higher risk of drinking an illness and that they are more likely to develop an illness than people who don’t.”

Drinking more beer can also have a negative effect on the health of the population.

“When Americans drink more beer and eat more meat, they’re eating more fat, which has a higher level of saturated fat, so there is more cardiovascular risk.

That means more people have higher rates of cardiovascular disease, and that leads to higher rates for type 2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease,” Ludwig added.

However, it’s not just people who choose to drink beer who are having a negative impact on the population, Ludwig says, noting that people with a lot of stress can also be at higher risk.

“We know that if a person has a lot or a lot at stake in their life, and they are feeling stressed out, then drinking alcohol might be good for them,” Ludwig explained.

Although the new study shows that the number and prevalence of foodborne infections in the world is on the rise, there are still millions of people worldwide who don, too, Ludwig said, adding that the situation could be improved by the development of better testing and prevention techniques.

There are also potential solutions to the problem, including the introduction of more robust, more effective vaccines for the different diseases caused by foodborne pathogens, he said.

“If we were able to introduce a more effective vaccine that would reduce the number [of people] who develop disease,” he said, “then that could be one of the first things we could do to get people back to a healthier lifestyle.”

The researchers found a link between increased beer consumption and higher levels of obesity and type 2 diabetics.

The research also found the number, age and sex of people with food allergies and asthma was linked to increased alcohol consumption.

This story originally appeared on BBC News UK.

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